Life's Bits & Pieces

There is so much we can do to keep our #opala out of the #landfill. I created centerpieces w/waterbottles, scissors & #ingenuity. #create #repurpose #upcycle #recycle #plastics #waterbottles turned into #table #centerpieces #vases #theskyisthelimit #recreate #diy #decorate #allMadeFromRecycledMaterial #lovetocraft #therapeuticForMe #myhobbie #apartmentlife #wailuku #maui #crafts #mahalokeakua (Hard to really see but there are two different styles.)
Goal is to repurpose something every day using items I have in the apartment. #inspiration

#tehya’s #restaurant is now open for #business!! #firstCustomer #missTeddyBear #imaginativePlay #childsplay #anakēandme #childcaremusings14 #twoyearsold #apartmentlife #wailuku #maui #mahalokeakua

#tehya’s #restaurant is now open for #business!! #firstCustomer #missTeddyBear #imaginativePlay #childsplay #anakēandme #childcaremusings14 #twoyearsold #apartmentlife #wailuku #maui #mahalokeakua

Pancakes & sausage, Aunty?? Coming right up!! #childsplay #childcaremusings14 #anakēandme #apartmentlife #tehya #playdoh #youngchef #chef #humpday #imaginativePlay #learningByPlaying #keikiokaaina #pokii #iphone5 #mahalokeakua

Pancakes & sausage, Aunty?? Coming right up!! #childsplay #childcaremusings14 #anakēandme #apartmentlife #tehya #playdoh #youngchef #chef #humpday #imaginativePlay #learningByPlaying #keikiokaaina #pokii #iphone5 #mahalokeakua

journaling-junkie:

If you wish to start a fire,
you must ignite the embers yourself—
a flame will not flicker 
until its Creator
commands its presence.

journaling-junkie:

If you wish to start a fire,
you must ignite the embers yourself—
a flame will not flicker
until its Creator
commands its presence.

Amen to that!!

Amen to that!!

(Source: healthyplace.com, via handmadepride)

diyforlifeblog:

New Post has been published on http://diyforlife.com/7-puzzle-piece-diy-ideas/7 Puzzle Piece DIY Ideas

diyforlifeblog:

New Post has been published on http://diyforlife.com/7-puzzle-piece-diy-ideas/

7 Puzzle Piece DIY Ideas

inspiringpieces:

Floral dressed

Artist Lim Zhi Wei, aka @lovelimzy discovered her talent for mixed material art, while she was trying to make a very special birthday gift for her grandmother. “I pressed some rose petals and made her a bookmark with a painted girl wearing a petal dress,” explained Wei. “That’s how the floral works started.”

Wei’s elegant compositions are always depicting the delicate shape of the female body, which she draws with watercolor, beautifully blended together with flower petals from orchids, roses, hydrangeas and chrysanthemum leaves.

[via]

MORE I Follow us: Inspiring Pieces

(via inspiringpieces)

An oldie but goodie! When I had my long hair. #hawaiian #oldstyleCanvas #timetocleancellphoneout #smiles #happiness #sexySundaySelfie #willingbloodline #mahalokeakua #maui #hi808 #nativeHawaiian #keahiblood #dudoitbloodline #fiveyearsago #2009

An oldie but goodie! When I had my long hair. #hawaiian #oldstyleCanvas #timetocleancellphoneout #smiles #happiness #sexySundaySelfie #willingbloodline #mahalokeakua #maui #hi808 #nativeHawaiian #keahiblood #dudoitbloodline #fiveyearsago #2009

unconsumption:

Here’s a fascinating — if not exactly uplifting — look at the economics, business, and design strategies that led to our throwaway culture came about: Modern Waste is an Economic Strategy « Discard Studies:

About one third of MSW [municipal solid waste] —food scraps, and to a debatable extent, yard trimmings—are present in pre-modern waste.
The rest of modern MSW are disposables: paper, plastics, aluminum, textiles, and packaging.[i] In 1956, Lloyd Stouffer, editor of Modern Packaging Inc., famously (and controversially at the time) declared: “The future of plastics is in the trash can” (Stouffer 1963: 1).
Stouffer’s idea addressed an emerging problem for industry. Products tended to be durable, easy to fix, and limited in variation (such as color or style). With this mode of design, markets were quickly saturating (Packard 1960; Cohen 2003). Opportunities for growth, and thus profit, were rapidly diminishing, particularly after America’s Great Depression and the two World Wars, where an ethos of preservation, reuse, and frugality was cultivated.
In response, industry intervened on a material level and developed disposability through planned obsolescence, single-use items, cheap materials, throw-away packaging, fashion, and conspicuous consumption. These changes were supported by a regimen of advertising that telegraphed industrial principals of value into the social realm, suggesting the difference between durable and disposable, esteemed and taboo.
American industry designed a shift in values that circulated goods through, rather than into, the consumer realm. The truism that humans are inherently wasteful came into being at a particular time and place, by design. 

There’s a ton of great info in this piece, it really is a good read. The over-arching point is that the shifts are so massive that we can’t solve them via individual behavior-change (recycling, etc.) alone; we need policy-level solutions.
I half-agree: Yes, we need policy-level solutions, but we’re more likely to get there by way of individual-level action, behavior change, and engagement. Which is what this site encourages.

unconsumption:

Here’s a fascinating — if not exactly uplifting — look at the economics, business, and design strategies that led to our throwaway culture came about: Modern Waste is an Economic Strategy « Discard Studies:

About one third of MSW [municipal solid waste] —food scraps, and to a debatable extent, yard trimmings—are present in pre-modern waste.

The rest of modern MSW are disposables: paper, plastics, aluminum, textiles, and packaging.[i] In 1956, Lloyd Stouffer, editor of Modern Packaging Inc., famously (and controversially at the time) declared: “The future of plastics is in the trash can” (Stouffer 1963: 1).

Stouffer’s idea addressed an emerging problem for industry. Products tended to be durable, easy to fix, and limited in variation (such as color or style). With this mode of design, markets were quickly saturating (Packard 1960; Cohen 2003). Opportunities for growth, and thus profit, were rapidly diminishing, particularly after America’s Great Depression and the two World Wars, where an ethos of preservation, reuse, and frugality was cultivated.

In response, industry intervened on a material level and developed disposability through planned obsolescence, single-use items, cheap materials, throw-away packaging, fashion, and conspicuous consumption. These changes were supported by a regimen of advertising that telegraphed industrial principals of value into the social realm, suggesting the difference between durable and disposable, esteemed and taboo.

American industry designed a shift in values that circulated goods through, rather than into, the consumer realm. The truism that humans are inherently wasteful came into being at a particular time and place, by design.

There’s a ton of great info in this piece, it really is a good read. The over-arching point is that the shifts are so massive that we can’t solve them via individual behavior-change (recycling, etc.) alone; we need policy-level solutions.

I half-agree: Yes, we need policy-level solutions, but we’re more likely to get there by way of individual-level action, behavior change, and engagement. Which is what this site encourages.

rainbowsandunicornscrafts:

DIY Washi Tape House from Poppinette. This is such an easy and cute DIY for a kid’s room. A Personal Experience Tip: Try a small piece of tape in an inconspiculous place to make sure it doesn’t rip off your paint.

rainbowsandunicornscrafts:

DIY Washi Tape House from Poppinette. This is such an easy and cute DIY for a kid’s room. A Personal Experience Tip: Try a small piece of tape in an inconspiculous place to make sure it doesn’t rip off your paint.

books-cupcakes:

Book Photo Challenge hosted by : Books & Cupcakes

Month: SeptemberIf you have any questions about the challenge please check the FAQ! Thank you and happy reading!! xoxo Jessica from Books and Cupcakes

books-cupcakes:

Book Photo Challenge hosted by : Books & Cupcakes

Month: September
If you have any questions about the challenge please check the FAQ! Thank you and happy reading!! 
xoxo Jessica from Books and Cupcakes

(via journaling-junkie)